Hi Friends,
                                              Even as I launch this today ( my 80th Birthday ), I realize that there is yet so much to say and do.
                                                  There is just no time to look back, no time to wonder,"Will anyone read these pages?"
                                       With regards,
                                       Hemen Parekh
                                       27 June 2013

Tuesday, 26 May 1981

PRODUCTIVITY

Synopsis: Communication For Productivity
Letters written to some 7500 Workers / Managers / Union Leaders, following a period of strike / Go slow / Murders (1979 - 1987), at Mumbai factory of Larsen & Toubro Ltd. This direct / open / honest communication led to a remarkable atmosphere of trust between Workers and Management, which, in turn, increased productivity at 3% per year (ave). 

26 May 1981

To:
Members of the Corporate Management (individually)           

             PRODUCTIVITY


I enclose herewith a copy of the minutes of the last Powai Level Productivity Committee Meeting.

The first Powai Level Productivity Committee meeting was held on. 24th August .1979 - almost 21 months ago. A total of 10 such meetings have been held so far, averaging one meeting every two months.   The frequency of the apex meeting (Powai level) was once every month when the productivity drive was launched.  The frequency now is once in 2/3 months.

As reported in my last OCM Presentation (February 16, 1981), the communication between the managers and the Union has by now acquired a good measure of openness and trust.  There are still many differences of  opinions  - but  these  are stated explicity.  There is also an appreciation of the fact that there may not be immediate solution to all the problems.   The  attitudes  on   either  side  are  gradually shifting  from one of  'adversary' to that  of cooperation in finding a solution.

I enclose herewith a copy of  a recent article on 'Industrial Relations in  USA'.  I consider  the contents of  the article as being very  relevant to the present state  of evolution in industrial relations that we  ourselves are passing thro' and therefore,  I 'have arranged  to  distribute  copies of  this article to  all .shop supervisors and  managers in  Powai.  I suggest  we   set  aside  one  entire  day   to  discuss  the experiments/theories mentioned in this article.   We may even attempt to chart our future 'IR' strategy.

In the meantime,  I would like to draw your attention  to the serious concern expressed by the members  of the Productivity Committee (in the minutes enclosed) with  regard to the under loading  of  various  shops  and  its  effect   on  the  shop productivity.

H.C. PAREKH

Friday, 1 May 1981

BRITAIN WORKS O.K.

Synopsis: Communication For Productivity
Letters written to some 7500 Workers / Managers / Union Leaders, following a period of strike / Go slow / Murders (1979 - 1987), at Mumbai factory of Larsen & Toubro Ltd. This direct / open / honest communication led to a remarkable atmosphere of trust between Workers and Management, which, in turn, increased productivity at 3% per year (ave). 

1May 1981


To:


Dear Readers


Although the first chapter of BRITAIN WORKS O.K.  came out a day  before  Mahatma  Gandhi's birthday  last  year,  it  did contain  the   theme  which  Mahatma   kept  on   asking  his countrymen throughout his life time i.e.

'What is right?'     
  rather than 
'Who is right?'

During   the  last   7  months,   this   publication  aroused considerable  interest  amongst  L&T-ites.  in the  February issue  we published  the comments  which  we received  from a 'well  wisher' who wanted all  of us  to be  less selfish and make   sacrifices for   the  good  of  the  company  and  the community.

In  this issue,  we  reproduce a  letter  from another  'well wisher'.  While  he has  made certain  comments, he  has also raised some  questions.  Although the  well-wisher has chosen to remain anonymous  (I do not understand why),  I feel I owe him an answer.

Whereas,  a common dining  hall and  common food  could bring Managers/Supervisors   and  Workmen   together  (this   is  a strictly  personal opinion)  it is  not  the only  thing that brings people  closer to each other.   It is true,  that in a family, all members share  the same food - but then, a family is  also  one of  the  few remaining  institutions  where one member does not  make 'demands' on another member!   It is an institution that  is  built  on everlasting  mutual  love, an intense   individual  desire  to  sacrifice   in  the  larger interest  of  the Unit  and  an everlasting  respect  for the elders.   Let us  work  together to  make L&T  such  a family first!

As regards obtaining a sense of  achievement and satisfaction in one's own work  is concerned, I do not  think there is any limitation  imposed by division  of  labour.  No matter,  how small a task,  the satisfaction one derives  comes from doing it  well today  and trying  to  do it  even  better tomorrow! Although I  do not  know what  is the task  performed by  the 'well wisher',  I cannot imagine the  task to be useless  and not contributing  to the well-being  of the  Society in which we live.

As  far  as  participation  by  all   levels  of  workmen  is concerned, I entirely agree with  the 'well wisher'  that the participation  in  our  productivity  drive must  not  remain restricted to  the office bearers of  the Union and  the shop representatives but must ultimately spread  to each and every employee of the Compan
As far as  implementing the many suggestions  which I receive in all sorts of forums,  I have only this to say.  Changes do not occur  overnight, and the  changes  of attitude  are most often the  slowest and the need for a change  in attitudes is not limited to any particular group  of employees.  Next time we have a problem, let each one  of us ask ourselves 'what is right'? before taking  a stand which is  against the interest of the community at large.

H.C. PAREKH